Sweet but Hard to Swallow

Published February 19, 2016

CerealsBrown sugar and white sugar are both made from sugarcane. Brown sugar also contains molasses and water and has a slightly lower calorific value than white sugar. White sugar is sweeter than brown sugar so they are not substitutes. Some people believe that brown sugar is healthier than white sugar but this is not true; both are equally harmful in large quantities.

Brown sugar used to be sugar that hadn’t been fully refined, it was coarse “raw” sugar. But now brown sugar is usually produced by adding cane molasses to refined white sugar crystals. Sugar beet molasses are also occasionally used. White sugar crystals are manufactured from either sugarcane or sugar beet. It is refined by immersion into a concentrated syrup. The crystals are then separated from the liquid and dissolved in water. Color is removed using a granular activated carbon or an ion-exchange resin, and the mixture is boiled and then cooled, spun in a centrifuge and then dried in hot air.

Both brown and white sugar are commonly used in baking and as sweeteners for coffee or tea. Brown sugar may be used in baked goods to create a richer taste, but the moistness can affect their appearance. Brown sugar can also be used to make marinades, but it does not make a good substitute in sauce recipes that call for white sugar because brown sugar has a different flavor and is less sweet.

Healthy Cereals

When it comes to finding healthy breakfast cereals, it can be quite a challenge. Many cereals are full of sugar and preservatives that pack on the pounds. Oatmeal is one of the only good cereals you can eat without feeling guilty. Oatmeal has been trendy with foodies and celebs for a while now, thanks in part to its rep as a low-fat, high-protein superfood. But here’s another reason to boil some water and make yourself a bowl tomorrow morning, oatmeal can keep you from packing on additional and unwanted pounds, according to a new study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

Researchers gave one group of study subjects oatmeal for breakfast, while a second group was served a ready-to-eat oat-based breakfast cereal. Both breakfasts clocked in at 363 total calories. When asked to rate their appetite at regular intervals after finishing, the oatmeal eaters described themselves as significantly less hungry and more satisfied than the cereal eaters—even up to four hours following their meal. Researchers think it has to do with the fact that oatmeal is thicker and delivers more filling fiber than other cereals. There are many different kinds of oatmeal on the market so when you choose one, try to stay away from the sugar.

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